Worn

Garments are made as and when — as and when cloth is available, as and when patterns are ready, as and when weather turns. Since this page shows garments being worn, it too is updated as and when, steadily through the year.

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles
The olive-green cardigan is made from super-soft cotton — super-soft being the operative word. The cotton is knitted as a link-stitch, with stitch-columns running down, at quarter-inch intervals, over a plain-stitch base-layer. It is worn here with an oatmeal linen Kelly collar shirt, and some dark-green corduroy trousers.

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

The airweave-cotton SB1 and the heather-cotton button-down shirt are both made with cloth woven by a mill in North Lancashire with a predilection of late for the weaving of a military-replica cloth. Both of the cottons here, then, are on the one hand very crisp and lightweight, and on the other, record-breakingly durable.

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

The Kelly collar shirt is back in brushed wool-cotton of pyjama-grade cotton from Lancashire. Above it is worn with proper trousers — heavyweight cotton-twill with lap-seams and reinforced seat and all-round traditional trouser heftiness — and a link-stitch cotton jumper of the fully-fashioned, expertly hand-loomed variety.

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles
If the prospect of an SB1, made from rope-dyed indigo hand-woven in London, on looms built a century ago to weave tweed, seems improbable — that is because it is. Though, from a distance, the cloth resembles denim, on closer inspection it proves nothing like it all, being terrifically soft in the handle and drape departments.

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

The colour-masters of the East Midlands dye-house, so the boast goes, can make over two-thousands different shades of orange. Luckily, they also do navy-blue — the colour of the raglan shirt (right) which is made in raw calico-cotton in London, garment-dyed in the Midlands, and sent back down the other way for buttoning.

Worn    Garments made with the makers of the British Isles

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