August — December 2012

The raglan mac is made from Ventile: a high-performance cotton not only almost impervious to water, but also highly durable, lightweight, and comfortable. The mac has two large button-through A4-sized pockets at the front, both of which have a smaller concealed pocket within and “warmer” pockets at the side.

The seam jacket is made from a wool-cashmere from a mill in West Yorkshire — part herringbone, part barleycorn pattern. The jacket itself has a hidden placket, a spread collar, and two patch pockets hidden under a fold-down seam that runs all the way around the body.

The peacoat (above) is made from bespoke wool-tweed woven in London from the undyed yarn of heritage breeds of sheep (the Jacob, Hebridean, and Welsh Black Mountain, to be exact). The reversible jacket, meanwhile, is made from a wool-tweed from West Yorkshire, and may be turned inside-out and worn on its reverse.

The tuck-stitch shawl-neck is made by a family-run knitwear maker from two colours of fine lambswool. The jumper is, in knitwear-speak, ten-ply. In everyday speak that means remarkable density and exceptional warmth. The crew-neck (below) is the same weight but comprises four colours: three greys and one green.

The three-button blazer is made from slate grey cord from Lancashire, cut on the horizontal rather than, as is the norm, the vertical. Despite its name, the blazer has a fourth button unders its lapel — allowing it to be fastened as above. It is worn here with a grey semi-cutaway shirt and charcoal fleck notch-back trousers.

The raglan corduroy shirt, made in dusty-green as shown here, and also slate-grey and nearly-black, has a half-hidden placket of Midlands-made horn buttons, and a small rounded collar. It is worn here with a semi-cutaway shirt, made from cream wool-cotton from Cumbria.

Worn erstwhile

    • July — September 2017
      New textures for what are quaintly called the warmer months of the year — like a two-ply birdseye, replicating cloth of the 1920s, and a Flyweight flavour of Ventile.
    • September 2016 — June 2017
      Angora, peccary leather, melton, cotton and linen with some wool mixed in, even some blanketing — a melting of materials for an unusually warm end to the year.
    • April — August 2016
      Texture, let it be known, is a quality tricky to come by in the warmer months, here in the British Isles. But look — hopsacks, tuck-stitches, and herringbones galore.
    • September 2015 — March 2016
      The heavy Donegal tweed balmacaan made its debut, as did the heavy duffle coat and, indeed, the heavy fur-felt hat. Lots of heavy things, then, for the colder months.
    • March — August 2015
      New linens came to the forefront: linen from the south coast of Ireland; linen hand-woven in the Outer Hebrides; linen knitted into crewnecks and cardigans.
    • September 2014 — February 2015
      Cloth development came thick and fast: yarn-dyed Ventile at the start of the period, and tweed made with organic and heritage fleece in the Inner Hebrides at the close.
    • January — August 2014
      Along came the SB1 jacket in hand-woven indigo cotton, the link-stitch crewneck and cardigan, the porkpie Ventile cotton hat, and a brace of cottons from Lancashire.
    • September — December 2013
      The cotton-twill trench coat rounded the year off, but before that came the peacoat and SB3 in Donegal's finest, as well as lambswool knitwear both heavy and light.
    • January — August 2013
      The first half of the year began with the three-button Tetris tweed blazer and concluded with an assortment of corduroy and cotton numbers — plus some shorts.
    • August — December 2012
      Heavyweight tuck-stitch jumpers, the wool-tweed peacoat made with the one-man-mill, and the debut of both the reversible jacket and the Ventile mac.
    • December 2011 — June 2012
      Early spring was met by the British Millerain dry-wax and cashmere mac, and kept busy with the linen suit, new tour jacket, and two-button neat jacket.
    • August — November 2011
      The last few months of 2011 witnessed the release of the chalkstripe-wool seam overshirt, the hopsack tweed neat jacket, and the birdseye wool-cashmere blazer.
    • February — May 2011
      Spring and early summer saw linen semi-cutaway shirts, the horizontal cord blazer, panama stowaway overshirts, and the cycle-friendly brushed cotton tour jacket.
    • September 2010 — January 2011
      The work jacket made a first appearance in French navy cotton-twill and charcoal wool-cashmere. And, on the knitwear front, Shetland Isle moss-stitch jumpers.
    • May — August 2010
      Five mostly interchangeable garments were made over the middle months of the year: two semi-cutaway shirts, two cotton-drill trousers, and a corduroy overshirt.